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A magazine for alumni and friends of the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University

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  • 12/08/16--13:33: Battling Deadly Fungi
  • Study reveals workings of immune response to deadly fungal infections. Every year, fungal infections threaten thousands of patients—from those with depressed immune systems to others who have had surgeries or devices such as catheters implanted. Moreover, some anti-fungal medications are beginning to lose their power. To help protect patients, researchers at Brown University and Rhode [...]

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    Gretchen E. Green ’96 MMS’98 MD’00 Radiologist Vice Chair, Board of Directors of the National Women’s History Museum Greensboro, NC How did you become interested in the history of medicine and women’s history? In high school, I wrote a history paper on Dr. Bertha Van Hoosen, the founder of the American Medical Women’s Association. The [...]

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    Sickle cell trait may lower blood sugar readings, causing missed diagnoses and treatment. A new study in JAMA provides evidence that hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), a common blood biomarker used to measure blood sugar over time, may not perform as accurately among African-Americans with sickle cell trait and could be leading to a systemic underestimation of [...]

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  • 02/10/17--08:31: The Genuine Article
  • For 40 years, Ed Feller has been an inimitable teacher, mentor, and friend at Brown. When Walter Klyce MD ’18 was trying to decide when to get married, he didn’t seek help from his parents or religious leader. Even his fiancée wasn’t sure what to do. So Klyce went to see Ed Feller. “Dr. Feller’s [...]

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  • 02/10/17--08:31: Expect the Worst
  • Conference brings disaster planners to Brown. On June 23, 2014, a patient walked into the emergency room of Phebe Hospital in Bong County, Liberia, suffering from vomiting, nausea, and diarrhea. Within a week, the patient and six of the nurses who cared for the patient were dead. This was the first case of Ebola in [...]

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  • 02/10/17--08:31: Peter Smith, MD F’77
  • Peter Smith, 75, died December 9 after a 10-year struggle with Parkinson’s disease and Lewy body dementia. He attended medical school at the University of Basel in Switzerland and completed residency at T. C. Thompson Children’s Hospital in Chattanooga, TN, in 1975. After completing the fellowship in pediatric hematology and oncology at Rhode Island Hospital [...]

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    Xian O’Brien (née Christian Shaver), 42, died unexpectedly November 15. She graduated from MIT with a bachelor’s degree in biology and cognitive studies in 1998, and earned a PhD in the Pathobiology Graduate Program at Brown in 2010. She completed her graduate and postdoctoral research in the Department of Surgery at the Warren Alpert Medical [...]

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    From the bookshelf Vision: How It Works and What Can Go Wrong By John E. Dowling, PhD, and Joseph L. Dowling Jr., MD ’47 GP’19 The MIT Press, 2016, $32 Vision is the dominant sense of the five we humans rely on to perceive the world; it’s no surprise that blindness is the disability people [...]

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  • 02/10/17--08:37: Married to Work
  • For better or worse, boundaries blur when both spouses have MDs. My grandmother in India is perpetually worried about me. Born in a generation when women seldom worked, especially after marriage, every Sunday phone call with her usually ends with a slew of concerns about how I am balancing running a household, staying healthy, and [...]

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  • 02/10/17--08:38: Race in Medical Education
  • The curriculum must challenge assumptions and unconscious bias. In fall 2014, Professor of Medical Science and Africana Studies Lundy Braun, PhD, offered an elective on race, health, and structural inequality to medical students. We examined the faulty biological basis of race—the fact that genetic differences are far higher within than between racial groups—and how the [...]

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  • 02/10/17--08:42: Social Justice League
  • A cadre of medical and legal advocates cares deeply about the health of people behind bars. In 2005, Bradley Brockmann, JD ’76 was working in Boston as a civil rights litigator for Prisoners’ Legal Services of Massachusetts. On December 20, Nelson Rodriguez, a 26-year-old man with a cognitive disability and mental illness, hanged himself in [...]

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  • 04/28/17--12:22: Mind the (Gender) Gap
  • Mindfulness class helps women, but not men, overcome a downcast mood, study finds. In a new study of a Brown University scholarly course on mindfulness that also included meditation labs, researchers found that the practice on average significantly helped women overcome “negative affect”—a downcast mood—but did not help men. The finding, the authors said, should [...]

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  • 05/16/17--08:23: The Other Side of Match Day
  • For residency program directors, there’s less drama, but still plenty of excitement. As the Medical School erupted in cheers and screams at noon on Match Day, it was business as usual at the residency program offices where students will begin their medical careers in July. “Match Day is like any other day,” says Craig P. [...]

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    Joanne Mitchell, 70, of Holliston, MA, died August 15, 2016. Born in Providence, she studied German and premed at Trinity College in Washington, DC, and earned her Master of Education in Child Studies at Tufts. In 1978, she decided to pursue her dream of a career in medicine; she completed her MD at age 41, [...]

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  • 05/16/17--11:03: Nathan S. Ross ’76 MD’79
  • Nathan Ross, 61, of Tacoma, WA, died January 27, 2016. A native of Worcester, MA, he did his residency, including a year as chief resident, at Case Western. He began his career in medicine at the West Los Angeles VA Medical Center, where he was assistant chief of endocrinology. He went on to become the [...]

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  • 05/16/17--11:17: Leading for Change
  • An alum heads a university with a mission to combat health disparities. When Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science in Los Angeles needed a new leader, taking on the role was a no-brainer for David M. Carlisle, PhD MD’81. The historically black university, known as CDU, established its medical school to care for [...]

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  • 05/16/17--11:35: Ars Medica
  • ‘Return to play’ has broader meaning for artists. Performing artists have much in common with athletes, Amity Rubeor, DO RES’05 says. Their activities result in specific types of injuries and strains—tennis elbow, in the case of the violinist who practices three hours a day, or Achilles tendonitis in the dancer—and they are just as eager [...]

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  • 05/18/17--08:39: Word Play
  • A resident learns the secret language of medicine. For anyone who has been in the company of medical professionals, it is immediately apparent (and possibly nauseating) that we share a complex jargon that can be hard to switch off. Recently, a colleague and I were musing over the medical hijacking of familiar English words. Wandering [...]

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  • 05/19/17--08:01: Health By the Numbers
  • With a new biomedical informatics center, Brown is taking a deep dive into big health data. On a chilly evening in downtown Providence, a gaunt man is rushed to the hospital, unconscious. He knows no one; no one knows him. Yet his doctor, whom he’s never met, already has an intimate knowledge of his health. [...]

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  • 05/19/17--08:39: Gripping Sidelines
  • A career in interventional radiology inspires an action-adventure fiction writer. A lost treasure. A mysterious explorer. Bad guys chasing unsuspecting academics. It’s not the plot of the latest Indiana Jones adventure but of The Lost Book of Wonders, the debut novel of Chad Brecher ’94 MD’98. Published this spring, it’s a fast-paced historical mystery that [...]

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